ABOUT US

Safety of Life at Sea...

The Race for Training Excellence, Begins With Us!

 

Established in 1992, Far East Maritime Foundation, Inc. (FEMFI) was conceived to provide and deliver quality training for Filipino seafarers. FEMFI firmly believes in the value formation of a world class seafarer through high standards of training and education.

 

Reflective of its pioneering and innovative spirit, FEMFI distinguished itself as among the most trusted maritime training centers in the country being the first to offer training program in the Ship Restricted Radio Operator Course (SRROC) and the INMARSAT/GMDSS courses.

 

Since then FEMFI has evolved from a one room training center to what is now one of the country’s leader in maritime training. By 1995 FEMFI was the first training center to expand to the south by establishing its branch in Cebu, and in 1998 the second branch was opened in Pangasinan.

 

The year 1999 was the year that marked the major expansion of FEMFI-Manila by adding more training courses in navigation and tanker operations. In year 2001  the basic and advanced safety courses were offered.

 

In line with FEMFI’s pursuit for excellence in maritime training and education, it has acquired its ISO 9002 certification from BVQI last February 1999 and was re-certified to ISO 9001:2000 standards in December 2003. And last May 2010 upgraded to ISO 9001:2008 standards.

 

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COURSES

Our Courses offered

New Courses Offered

  • Ship Security Awareness Training and Seafarers with Designated Security Duties

     

    SHIP SECURITY AWARENESS TRAINING AND SEAFARERS WITH DESIGNATED SECURITY DUTIES

    (Course Description)

     

    AIM

    The course will provide the participants the required standard of competence to contribute to the enhancement of maritime security through heightened awareness, recognition of security threats and how to respond appropriately, enabling them to undertake their assigned duties under the Ship Security Plan (SSP), if any.

     

    SCOPE

    The course covers theory and practical exercises on the applicable provisions of the ISPS Code and Chapter XI-2 (Special measures to enhance maritime security),  of SOLAS 74, as amended, and meets the requirements of Regulation VI/6 (Mandatory minimum requirements for security-related training and instruction for all seafarers), of the STCW Convention, as amended; and Section A-VI/6, Paragraph 4-8, Tables A-VI/6-1 and A-VI/6-2 of the STCW Code 2010 Manila Amendments; taking into account the recommendations prescribed in the IMO Model Course 3.26, Security Training for Seafarers with Designated Security Duties, 2012 Edition and IMO Model Course 3.27, Security Awareness Training for All Seafarers, 2012 Edition.

     

    EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES

     

    After the training, the participants shall be able to:

    • know how to maintain the conditions set forth in a ship security plan

    • recognize security risks and threats

    • know how to undertake regular security inspections of the ship and

    • use available security equipments and systems.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

    • Seafarers or other shipboard personnel who will not be assigned specific security duties in connection with the SSP and/ or;

    • Seafarers or other shipboard personnel who are likely to have designated security duties in connection with the SSP.

    • Seafarers who have already completed the Ship Security Officer (IMO Model Course 3.19) under the 2006 Amendments and attended the updated SSO Model Course 3.19 in accordance with the 2010 Manila Amendments and those who completed the 2012 Edition are exempted from this course.

     

    DURATION

     

    8 hours (1 day)

     

    COURSE CERTIFICATE

     

    A Certificate of Completion shall be issued to a participant who successfully completes the requirements of the course

     

    COURSE INTAKE LIMITATIONS

     

    A maximum of 24 participants

    FACULTY REQUIREMENTS (INSTRUCTOR(S))

    a) Must be a Merchant Marine Officer with at least 12 months experience as an Officer

     

    b) Must be a MARINA-STCW accredited  instructor

    FACULTY  REQUIREMENTS (ASSESSOR)

    a) Must be a Merchant Marine Officer with at least 12 months experience in an Officer capacity

     

          b)   Must be a MARINA-STCW accredited instructor and assessor

     

    TEACHING METHOD/S

    • Lectures-discussions

    • Workshops

    • Practical demonstrations

     

    TEACHING FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT

     

    • Classroom for lectures

    • Hypermedia equipment

    • 1 unit of handheld metal detector

    • Step board

    • Table

    • Handbag containing the following items:

    • dummy knife hidden in between pages of a book

    • dummy incendiary devices

    • suspicious looking electronic equipment

    • other personal item.

  • Advance Training For Oil Tanker Cargo Operations (formerly STOT)

    ADVANCED TRAINING FOR OIL TANKER CARGO OPERATIONS

     

    (Course Description)

     

    Scope

     

    This course provides training for Masters, chief engineer officers, chief mates, second engineer officers and any person with immediate responsibility for loading, unloading care in transit, handling of cargo, tank cleaning or other cargo related operations on oil tankers. It comprises an advanced training programme appropriate to their duties on oil tankers for their ability to imbibe a safety culture to perform & monitor all cargo operations, familiarity with properties of oil cargoes, take precautions to prevent hazards, apply health &safety precautions, respond to emergencies fire safety measures, take precautions to prevent pollution of the environment, and monitor & control compliance with legislative requirements. The course takes full account of Section A-V/1-1 para 3 of the STCW Code adopted by the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watch keeping for Seafarers 1978, as amended.

     

    This training may be given on board or ashore. It can be supplemented by practical training on board or wherever possible on simulators in training institutions or in a suitable shore-based installation.

     

    Objective

     

    Provided they hold an appropriate certificate and are otherwise qualified in accordance with Regulation A-V/1-1 para 2.2 of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, as amended, those successfully completing the Advanced training in oil tanker cargo operations course should therefore be able to safely perform their duties for loading, unloading and care in transit or handling of cargo on oil tankers. They will make a safer and more effective contribution to the operation and control of the cargo on oil tanker, which will improve the ship safety and provide greater protection to the environment in particular.

     

    Entry standards

     

    This course is open to any person with immediate responsibility for loading, unloading care in transit, handling of cargo, tank cleaning or other cargo related operations on oil tankers. It comprises of seafarers who have qualified in accordance with Regulation V/1-1 para 4 of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watch keeping for Seafarers 1978, as amended.

     

    Course certificate

     

    All who are qualified in ―Advanced training for oil tanker cargo operations‖ programme in accordance with Regulation V/1-1 paragraphs 3 shall be issued with a certificate of proficiency.

     

    Course intake limitations

     

    The number of trainees should not exceed 20 and practical training should be undertaken in small groups of not more than eight.

     

    Staff requirements

     

    The instructor shall have appropriate training in instructional techniques and training methods (STCW Code, Section A-I/6, para 7). It is recommended that all training and instruction is given by qualified personnel experienced in the handling and characteristics of oil cargoes and the safety procedures involved. Staff may be recruited among deck and engineer officers of oil tankers, and / or fleet superintendents as appropriate.

     

    Teaching facilities and equipment

     

    Ordinary classroom facilities and an overhead projector are sufficient for most of the Course. However, dedicated CBT modules to be run on an ordinary PC as well as exercises on an operational, hands-on liquid cargo handling simulator, will greatly enhance the quality and result of the course. In such cases sufficient PCs for use by one or two trainees will be required. In addition, a video player will be required if using videos in the teaching program.

    The following equipment should be available:

     

    1. Resuscitator

    2. Breathing apparatus

    3. Portable oxygen meter

    4. Portable combustible-gas detector

    5. Portable tankscope / Multi point flammable gas (infra- red gas analyzer)

    6. Portable toxic-gas detector & chemical absorption tubes

    7. Portable multigas – detector

    8. Personal multigas – detector

    9. Tank evacuation equipment.

     

     Use of Simulators

     

    The revised STCW Convention sets standards regarding the performance and use of simulators for mandatory training, assessment or demonstration of competence. The general performance standards for simulators used in training and for simulators used in assessment of competence are given in Section A-l/12. Simulator -based training and assessment is not a mandatory requirement for this ―Advanced training for oil tanker cargo operations‖ course. However, it is widely recognized that well-designed lessons and exercises can improve the effectiveness of training.

     

    If using simulator-based training, instructors should ensure that the aims and objective of these sessions are defined within the overall training program and that tasks are selected so as to relate as closely as possible to shipboard tasks and practices. Instructors should refer to STCW, Section A-I/12, Part 1 and 2.

  • Advance Training For Chemical Tanker Cargo Operations (formerly STCT)

    ADVANCED TRAINING FOR CHEMICAL TANKER CARGO OPERATIONS

     

    (Course Description)

     

     Scope

     

    This course provides training for Masters, chief engineer officers, chief mates, second engineer officers and any person with immediate responsibility for loading, unloading care in transit, handling of cargo, tank cleaning or other cargo related operations on chemical tankers. It comprises an advanced training programme appropriate to their duties on chemical tankers for their ability to imbibe a safety culture to perform & monitor all cargo operations, familiarity with properties of chemical cargoes, take precautions to prevent hazards, apply health & safety precautions, respond to emergencies fire safety measures, take precautions to prevent pollution of the environment, and monitor & control compliance with legislative requirements. The course takes full account of Table A-V/1-1-3 of the STCW Code adopted by the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watch keeping for Seafarers 1978, as amended.

     

     

     Training Outcomes

     

    Each participant completing the course should be able to:

     

    • Safely perform and monitor all cargo operations;

    • Familiarize with the physical and chemical properties of chemical cargoes;

    • Take precautions to prevent hazards on chemical tankers;

    • Apply occupational health and safety precautions;

    • Respond to emergencies;

    • Take precautions to prevent pollution of the marine environment;

    • Monitor and control compliance with legislative requirements.

     

     Entry standards

     

    This course is open to any person with immediate responsibility for loading, unloading care in transit, handling of cargo, tank cleaning or other cargo related operations on oil tankers. It comprises of seafarers who have qualified in accordance with Regulation V/1-1 paragraph 2.2 of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watch keeping for Seafarers 1978, as amended.

     

    Participants should have taken the “Basic Training for Oil and Chemical Tanker Operations” Course.

     

     Course certificate

     

    On successful completion of this course, a certificate should be issued certifying that the holder has successfully completed a training course for Advance Training for Chemical Tanker Cargo Operations meeting the standards of competence specified in Section A-V/1-1, paragraph 3, of the STCW Code as amended in 2010.

     

     Course intake limitations

     

    The course intake shall not exceed 24 participants in a class. Practical training should be conducted in laboratory/training site utilizing relevant tools, equipment in conjunction with a simulator as appropriate in accordance with the Administration guidelines of 1:3 man-machine ratio.

     

     Staff requirements

     

    The qualifications of the instructor, assessor and resource person should be in accordance with the requirements laid down in Section A-1/6 paragraph 7 of the STCW Code. He/she should be thoroughly familiar with the operation of the equipment and simulator as appropriate to be used in the course.

     

    Instructor’s qualification

     

    • Management Level officer with at least 12 months sea going service on that capacity onboard a chemical tanker and has undergone an approved training program for teaching (IMO Model Course 6.09);

    • When conducting teaching with use of simulators, shall possess appropriate certificate for conducting training with the use of a simulator.

     

    Assessor’s qualification

     

    • Management level with at least 12 months sea going service serving onboard a ship on that capacity onboard a chemical tanker and has and has undergone an approved training program for teaching (IMO Model Course 6.09) and assessor’s training program (IMO Model Course 3.12);

    • When conducting assessment with use of simulators, shall possess appropriate certificate for conducting practical assessment with the use of a simulator.

     

     Teaching facilities and equipment

     

    Ordinary classroom facilities and overhead projector are sufficient for most of the course, and if possible a visit to a tanker should be arranged. When making use of audio-visual materials, the appropriate equipment must be available.

     

    It is widely recognized that well-designed lessons and exercises can improve the effectiveness of training and shorten training times compared to traditional methods.

     

    The following equipment should be available:

    1. Resuscitator

    2. Self-contained Breathing apparatus for emergency escape

    3. Portable oxygen meter

    4. Portable combustible-gas detector

     

  • Basic Training For Oil and Chemical Tanker  Cargo Operations (formerly GTF)

    BASIC TRAINING FOR OIL AND CHEMICAL TANKER CARGO OPERATIONS

    (Course Description)

     

    Scope

     

    This course provides training for officers and ratings. It comprises a basic training programme appropriate to their duties, including oil and chemical tanker safety, fire safety measures and systems, pollution prevention, operational practice and obligations under applicable laws and regulations. The course takes full account of Section A-V/1-1 of the STCW Code adopted by the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers 1978, as amended, including the Manila amendments 2010.

     

    This training may be given on board or ashore. It can be supplemented by practical training on board or wherever possible on simulators in training institutions or in a suitable shore-based installation.

     

    Objective

     

    Provided they hold an appropriate certificate and are otherwise qualified in accordance with Section A-VI/1 of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers 1978, as amended, those successfully completing the course may be eligible to serve on board Oil and Chemical tankers.

     

    Entry standards

     

    This course is open to seafarers who have qualified in accordance with Section A-VI/1 of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers as per 2010 Manila amendments and approved by the Administration.

     

    Course certificate

     

    All who are qualified in Basic training for oil and chemical tanker cargo operations programme in accordance with regulation V/1-1 paragraphs 1 or 2 shall be issued with an appropriate certificate.

     

    Course intake limitations

     

    The number of trainees should not exceed 24 and practical training should be undertaken in small groups of not more than eight.

     

    Staff requirements

     

    The instructor shall have appropriate training in instructional techniques and training methods (STCW Code A-I/6, para 7). It is recommended that all training and instruction is given by qualified personnel experienced in the handling and characteristics of Oil and Chemicals cargoes and the safety procedures involved. Staff may be recruited among deck and engineer officers of Oil and Chemical tankers, and / or fleet superintendents as appropriate.

     

     

     

     

     

    Teaching facilities and equipment

     

    Ordinary classroom facilities and an overhead projector are sufficient for most of the Course. However, dedicated CBT modules to be run on an ordinary PC as well as exercises on an operational, hands-on liquid cargo handling simulator, will greatly enhance the quality and result of the course. In such cases sufficient number of PCs for use by trainees will be required. In addition, a video player will be required if using videos in the teaching program.

     

    The following equipment should be available:

    1. Resuscitator

    2. Breathing apparatus

    3. Portable oxygen meter

    4. Portable combustible-gas detector

    5. Portable tankscope / Multi point flammable gas (infra- red gas analyzer)

    6. Portable toxic-gas detector & chemical absorption tubes

    7. Portable multigas – detector

    8. Personal multigas – detector

    9. Tank evacuation equipment.

     

    Use of Simulators

     

    The revised STCW Convention sets standards regarding the performance and use of simulators for mandatory training, assessment or demonstration of competence. The general performance standards for simulators used in training and for simulators used in assessment of competence are given in Section A-l/12. Simulator-based training and assessment is not a mandatory requirement for this Basic training for Oil and Chemical tanker course. However, it is widely recognized that well-designed lessons and exercises can improve the effectiveness of training. If using simulator-based training, instructors should ensure that the aims and objective of these sessions are defined within the overall training program and that tasks are selected so as to relate as closely as possible to shipboard tasks and practices. Instructors should refer to STCW, Section A-I/12, Part 2.

  • Basic Training For Liquefied Gas Tanker Tanker  Cargo Operations

    BASIC TRAINING FOR LIQUEFIED GAS TANKER CARGO OPERATIONS

    (Course Description)

     

    Scope

     

    This course provides training for officers and ratings. It comprises a basic training programme appropriate to their duties for liquefied gas tanker safety, fire safety measures and cargo systems, pollution prevention, safe operational practices and obligations under applicable laws and regulations. The course takes full account of Section A-V/1-2 of the STCW Code adopted by the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watch keeping for Seafarers 1978, as amended.

     

    This training may be given on board or ashore. It can be either by practical training on board or wherever possible on simulators in training institutions or in a suitable shore-based installation.

     

    Objective

     

    Provided they hold an appropriate certificate and are otherwise qualified in accordance with section A – VI / 1 of STCW convention 78 as amended, those successfully completing the Basic training for liquefied gas tanker cargo operations course should therefore be able to carry out specific duties during loading, unloading and care in transit or handling of cargo on liquefied gas tankers. They will make a safer and more effective contribution to the operation on a liquefied gas tanker, which will improve the ship safety and provide greater protection to the environment.

     

    Entry standards

     

    This course is open to seafarers who have qualified in accordance with regulation Section A-VI/1 of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers 1978, as amended.

     

    Course certificate

     

    All who are qualified in Basic training for liquefied gas tanker cargo operations programme in accordance with regulation V/1-2 paragraphs 1 or 2 shall be issued with a certificate of proficiency.

     

    Course intake limitations

     

    The number of trainees should not exceed 20 and practical training should be undertaken in small groups of not more than eight.

     

    Staff requirements

     

    The instructor shall have appropriate training in instructional techniques and training methods (STCW Code A-I/6, paragraph 7). It is recommended that all training and instruction is given by qualified personnel experienced in the handling and characteristics of liquefied gas cargoes and the safety procedures involved. Staff may be recruited among deck and engineer officers of liquefied gas tankers, and / or fleet superintendents as appropriate.

     

    Teaching facilities and equipment

     

    Ordinary classroom facilities and an overhead projector are sufficient for most of the Course. However, dedicated CBT modules to be run on an ordinary PC as well as exercises on a operational, hands-on liquid cargo handling simulator, will greatly enhance the quality and result of the course. In such cases sufficient PCs for use by one or two trainees will be required. In addition, a video player will be required if using videos in the teaching program.

    The following equipment should be available:

    1. Resuscitator;

    2. Breathing apparatus;

    3. Portable oxygen meter

    4. Portable combustible-gas detector;

    5. Portable tankscope / Multi point flammable gas (infra- red gas analyser);

    6. Portable toxic-gas detector & chemical absorption tubes;

    7. Portable multigas – detector;

    8. Personal multigas – detector; and

    9. Tank evacuation equipment.

     

    Use of Simulators

     

    The revised STCW Convention sets standards regarding the performance and use of simulators for mandatory training, assessment or demonstration of competence. The general performance standards for simulators used in training and for simulators used in assessment of competence are given in Section A-l/12. Simulator -based training and assessment is not a mandatory requirement for this Basic training for liquefied gas tanker course. However, it is widely recognized that well-designed lessons and exercises can improve the effectiveness of training.

     

    If using simulator-based training, instructors should ensure that the aims and objective of these sessions are defined within the overall training program and that tasks are selected so as to relate as closely as possible to shipboard tasks and practices. Part D 3 included herein gives the sample exercises which can be performed to enhance the learning. Instructors should refer to STCW, Section A-I/12, Part 2.

Advanced Training Courses

  • Accident Investigation (AI)

     

  • Automatic Identification System Familiarization (AIS)

    AUTOMATIC IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM

    (Course Description)

     

    The AIS is a shipboard broadcast system that acts like a transponder, operating in the VHF maritime band that is capable of handling well over 4,500 reports per minute and updates as often as every two seconds. It uses Self-Organizing Time Division Multiple Access (SOTDMA) technology to meet this high broadcast rate and ensure reliable ship-to-ship operation.

     

    Maneuvering information, closest point of approach (CPA), time to closest point of approach (TCPA) and other navigation information, more accurate and timelier than information available from an automatic radar plotting aid, could also be available.

     

    This training course aims to provide knowledge and appropriate skill and competency to operate the Automatic Identification System (AIS) of a vessel / ship.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    Upon successful completion of this training course, the trainee shall be able to:

     

    1. Acquire / upgrade knowledge on the operation of AIS;

    2. Assist in detection, monitoring, and target tracking of vessel/s using AIS

    3. Exchange information between stations using AIS

    4. Understand and apply the features, cautions, and limitations in using AIS as navigational and security tool.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    This training program is intended for all deck officers on board inter-island and international vessels.

     

    CERTIFICATION

     

    As authorized by the Maritime Industry Authority, pursuant to Regulation 19, Chapter V (Safety of Navigation) of the International Maritime Organization’s Convention on Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 as amended, as SOLAS Conference Resolution No. 10 on Ship’s Identification and Tracking, Adopted on December 12, 2002.

     

    INCLUDED TOPICS

     

    Overview of AIS; Carriage requirements; Technical Aspects of AIS; Use of AIS in Collision Avoidance and Maritime Security; System Installation; hands-on Operation of AIS.

  • Auxiliary Machinery (AM)

     

  • Bridge Resource Management (BRM)

    BRIDGE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

    (Course Description)

     

    This program is designed to ensure effective use of personnel and equipment during vessel operation and to reduce errors and omissions in bridge operation through simple system of checks and delegating of duties. it emphasizes a coordinated effort of deck and engine personnel to ensure smooth, efficient and safe operations of vessels.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    • The trainees who successfully complete this course will gain experience in handling ships under various conditions and will make a more effective contribution to the bridge and engine team during ship maneuvering.

    • To assist the ship’s master and chief engineer manage the vessel’s bridge and engine team for each voyage so personnel are rested, trained and prepared to handle any situation.

    • To help recognize workloads demands and other risk factor that may affect decisions in setting watch conditions.

    • To ensure bridge and engine team members are trained and aware of their responsibilities.

    • To help bridge and engine team members interact with a support to the master and/or chief engineer.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    This training course program is open to shipboard personnel of merchant ship of any type under operational or management level of the deck or engine department.

     

    COURSE CERTIFICATE

     

    On successful completion of this course, a document will be issued certifying that the holder has successfully completed the entire course.

  • Bridge Team Management (BTM)

  • Cargo Handling and Care of Cargo (CHCC)

    CARGO HANDLING AND CARE OF CARGO

    (Course Description)

     

    The course provides basic training in cargo handling and cargo care for deck officers of dry cargo ships. It covers goods in packaged form and dry cargoes in bulk, including dangerous substances, and related car-handling gear and equipment. Subjects such as loading and discharge, stowage, segregation, ventilation and general safety precautions are covered.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    Those successfully completing this course will thereby be enabled to:

    - make safe and effective use of basic cargo-handling gear and equipment

    - properly prepare cargo spaces

    - properly handle and stow general cargoes

    - care of the cargo during transit

    - properly ventilate cargo spaces

    - properly handle and stow dry bulk cargoes

    - take necessary measures when handling dangerous goods

    - take all appropriate safety precautions

    - comply with national and international regulatory requirements

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    The course is open to those being trained to serve as masters and deck officers on ships engaged in near-coastal voyages or those on internal waters. No advanced mathematical knowledge is required.

     

    CERTIFICATE

     

    On successful completion of the course, a certificate or diploma should be issued, attesting that the holder has successfully completed a course on basic cargo handling and cargo care.

     

    INTAKE LIMITATION

     

    The number of trainees should not normally exceed twenty.

     

    STAFF REQUIREMENTS

     

    The instructor should hold a certificate as master and have adequate experience in the handling of general and dry bulk cargoes.

  • Collision Avoidance (CA)

  • Consolidated Marine Pollution 73/78 Annex I-VI (CON. MARPOL I-VI)

    CONSOLIDATED MARPOL 73/78 ANNEXES I-VI

    (MTC Course Program 2010-01)

    (Course Description)

     

    SCOPE

     

    This course aims to impart the mandatory minimum requirements of the 1978 International Convention on Standards of Training Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), as amended for knowledge, understanding and proficiency of marine deck and engineer officers in the operational and management levels as provided in Sections A-II/1, II/2, II/3 and in Tables A-III/1, III/2, and III/3, respectively, of the STCW Code for the function Controlling the Operation of the Ship and Care for Persons on Board.

     

    This consolidated course covers the requirements of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973 as modified by the Protocols of 1978 and 1997 (MARPOL 73/78) based on the technical content provided in Annexes I to VI.

     

    This course requires a total of forty (40) instructional hours to complete, consisting of theory (70%) and demonstration/practical work (30%) activities. The subject matter includes Introduction; MARPOL Annex I Prevention of Pollution by Oil); MARPOL Annex II (Control of Pollution by Noxious Liquid Substances); MARPOL Annex III (Prevention of Pollution by Harmful Substances Carried by Sea in Packaged Form); MARPOL Annex IV (Prevention of Pollution by Seawage from Ships); MARPOL Annex V (Prevention of Pollution by Garbage from Ships); and MARPOL Annex VI (Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships).

     

    The conduction of assessment and evaluation is allotted thirty (30) minutes for written and one (1) hour of practical assessment.

     

    OBJECTIVES

     

    The trainees who successfully complete the course will make a safer and more effective contribution in “controlling the operation of the ship and care for persons on board” function and in complying with the provisions of the MARPOL 73/78 Convention.

     

    In particular, the trainees shall be able to:

     

     Discuss the objectives of MARPOL 73/78 Convention;

     Understand the possible impact of pollution to the environment;

     Explain how ships contribute in polluting the environment;

     Explain responsibilities and obligations under international regulations aimed at preventing various forms of pollution by ships; and

     Introduce effective pollution management scheme.

     Demonstrate competence in preventing/controlling pollution appropriate to position held onboard.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    This course is open to marine deck and engine officers and other personnel responsible in ensuring compliance of onboard operations to regulations of the MARPOL 73/78 Convention as modified in Protocol 1997

     

    COURSE CERTIFICATE

     

    On successful completion of this course, i.e. after passing both theoretical and practical assessments and having attendance at least 90% of the total number of training hours, a Certificate of Completion shall be issued certifying a holder’s acquisition of the mandatory minimum requirements and competence as specified in Regulation II/1, II/2, or II/3 or Regulation III/1, III/2 or III/3 of the 1978 III/1, III/2, or III/3 of the STCW Code, as appropriate.

     

    COURSE INTAKE LIMITATIONS

     

    The course intake should be limited to twenty-four (24) trainees forming a maximum of six groups of four trainees which can be accommodated in the laboratory/practical exercises.

     

    STAFF REQUIREMENTS

     

    Trainer

     

    Training and instruction should be handled by a dully licensed marine deck or engine officer at least at the operational level; should be knowledgeable of the course program; qualified in the task for which is being conducted; must be a holder of a training certificate in Training Course for Instructor (IMO MC 6.09); should have received appropriate guidance in instructional techniques involving the use of simulators (Training Program for Instructors Conducting Simulator-based Training); and gained operational experience on the particular type of simulator being used when necessary.

     

    Trainer assigned to handle Annexes I and II should have served as officer on board tanker vessel.

     

    ASSESSOR

     

    The assigned assessor/s should have the same qualification as the trainer and must be a holder of a training certificate in Assessment, Examination and Certificate of Seafarers (IMO MC 3.12)

  • Control Engineering (CE)

  • Crude Oil Washing / Inert Gas System (COW / IGS)

    CRUDE OIL WASHING w/ INERT GAS SYSTEM

    (Course Description)

     

    This course provides training at an advanced level for masters, officers and other persons on board oil tankers who have immediate responsibility for the loading, discharging and care in transit or handling of cargo; it comprises a specialized training programme appropriate to their duties, including oil tanker safety, fire safety measures and systems, pollution prevention and control, operational practice and obligations under applicable laws and regulations. The course takes full account of the Annex to resolution 10* adopted by the International Conference on Training and Certification of Seafarers, 1978.

     

    The course also includes all the training necessary to apply the provisions of Annex 1, Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution by Oil, of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, as modified by the 1978 Protocol related thereto, as amended (MARPOL 73/78); and resolution 15 of the 1978 Conference on Tanker Safety and Pollution Prevention. Training in inert gas systems and crude oil washing is presented in two modules which may be included in the training programme as appropriate. The module on inert gas systems may be included alone, but the module on crude oil washing should only be used in conjunction with the one on inert gas systems.

     

    OBJECTIVES

     

    Provided they hold an appropriate certificate and are otherwise qualified in accordance with regulation V/1(2)* of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, (STCW) 1978, those successfully completing the course should be able to serve as master, chief engineer officer, chief mate or second engineer officer or to take immediate responsibility for loading, discharging and care in transit or handling of cargo in an oil tanker.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    This course is open to seafarers who have completed an appropriate advanced fire-fighting training courses* approved by the Administration, and who have relevant experience appropriate to their duties on oil tankers, as stipulated in STCW regulation V/1.2(a).

     

    CERTIFICATE

     

    Pursuant to the provisions of MTC Resolution No. 03, series of 1998 and for having been assessed by a qualified assessor in accordance with the approved method and criteria.

     

    TOPICS INCLUDED: Introduction, Inert Gas System, General Provisions, IGS Components, Fixed Inert Gas System, Introduction of Crude Oil Washing System, Purpose and Application, General Provisions, Design Criteria, Qualification of Personnel, Operation, Operations and Equipment Manual, Practical Exercises.

  • Dangerous Hazardous & Harmful Cargoes (DHHC)

    DANGEROUS, HAZARDOUS & HARMFUL CARGOES

     

    This course is intended for:

     Seafaring personnel responsible for the handling of packaged dangerous hazardous and harmful cargoes (hereafter referred to as “dangerous foods”) aboard ships; and

     

    The course includes, but is not limited to: classification, packaging, consignment procedures, loading and segregation.

     

    Most of the course material is common to both target groups, although the time needed for individual topics will vary. For example, seafaring staff needs more detailed consideration of stowage than those on shore, whilst the reverse is true of packaging manufacturing and testing. The two course timetables, although intended for general guidance only, reflect these carrying needs. However, it may be possible for experienced instructors, by amending the timetables and presentations, to accommodate seafaring and shore – based staff on the same course.

     

    The course has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of section A-II/2 of the Seafarer’s Training, Certification and Watch keeping (STCW) Code and follows the guidance contained in section B-V/5 of the code (R1).

     

    The training provided by this course should be supplemented by practical experience at sea or in shore – based operations, as appropriate.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    Trainees successfully completing this course will be able to contribute to the preparation and execution of the safe carriage of dangerous goods and Marine Pollutants by sea, understand the legal implications of, and correctly apply or verify compliance with the:

    1. detailed instructions including safe packing, handling, stowage and segregation of dangerous, hazardous and harmful cargoes, and the precautions necessary in  relation to other cargoes as set out in the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code and its Supplement

    2. IMO/ILO/UN ECE Guidelines for the Packing of Cargo Transport Units (CTUs)

    3. Recommendations on the Safe Transport, of Dangerous Cargoes and Related Activities in Port Areas

     

    And as far as they affect the transport of dangerous goods, the:

    4. Code of Safe Practice for Cargo Stowage and Securing

    5. Recommendations on the Safe Use of Pesticides in Ships  and

    6. International Convention for Safe Containers, 1972 (CSC)

     

    In addition, trainees will have an appreciation of the importance and the impact on the safe handling and carriage of dangerous cargoes by sea of:

    7. part A of chapter VII of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974, as amended

    8. regulation II-2/54 of SOLAS 1974, as amended, in respect of ships intended to carry dangerous goods

    9. Annex III of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978 relating thereto (MARPOL 73/78), as amended  and

    10. protocol I to MARPOL 73/78, as amended, and the associated reporting procedures set forth in resolution A.648 (16), General principles for ship reporting systems and ship reporting requirements, including guidelines for reporting incidents involving dangerous goods, harmful substances and/or marine pollutants, adopted by the IMO Assembly on 27 October 1989

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    The course is designed as a free-standing one and is not dependent on a set level of knowledge required. However, for seafarers, additional training as specified by the STCW Convention may be necessary to achieve appropriate qualification. If use as a module for the certification of seafarers in accordance with section A-II/2 of the STCW Code, the required educational background for such certification applies.

     

    The course can also be used for the training of experienced key ratings who have, or are intended to have responsibilities for dangerous goods.

     

    COURSE CERTIFICATE, DIPLOMA OR DOCUMENT

     

    A trainee who successfully completes the course program will be issued with a certificate attesting that he or she has completed the entire course which meets or exceeds the level of knowledge specified in the STCW Convention, regulation A-II/2.

     

    COURSE INTAKE LIMITATIONS

     

    The number of trainees should not exceed 24. Any activity should be undertaken in small groups of not more than five and be subjected to adequate supervision.

     

  • DECKWATCHKEEPING (DWK)

    RATINGS FORMING PART OF A NAVIGATIONAL WATCH

    (Course Description)

     

    This course covers the mandatory minimum requirements for certification of ratings prescribed by Regulation II/4 paragraph 2 (2.2) Section A – II/4 paragraph 2 of STCW 1978 Convention, as amended.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    On successful completion of the model course and assessment/examination, trainee should be able to demonstrate the competence to perform the navigation function at the support level, as specified in column 1 & 2 of the table A-II/4 of the STCW Code.

     

    In addition, to encourage safety consciousness, trainee will have acquired working knowledge, understanding and proficiency as well as the demonstration of competence in watch keeping, protection of the marine environment and safety of life at sea.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    This course is principally intended for the candidates for certification who shall:

     

    1. be not less than 16 years of age

    2. have completed the Basic Safety Course and passed the Ishihara test

    3. have completed seagoing service including not less than six months training and experience or special training, either pre-sea or on board, including an approved period or seagoing service which shall not be less than two months.

    4. meet the standard of competence specified in Section A-II of the STCW-78 Convention as amended.

     

    CERTIFICATE

     

    The trainee who completes this course will issued a Certificate of Completion certifying that the holder meets or exceeds the level of knowledge specified in Section A-II/4, mandatory requirements for ratings forming part of a navigational watch, Column 3 & 4 of Table A-II/4, Regulation 8 of the STCW-78 Convention as amended.

     

    INSTRUCTORS QUALIFICATION

     

    1. Must be a holder of Certificate of Instructors Course IMO Model Course 6.09

    2. Knowledgeable of the course program

    3. Qualified in the task for which training is being conducted. Marine Deck officer with 1 year sea experience on board vessels with at least 500 gross tonnage in that capacity.

     

     

  • Eectronic Chart Display and Information System (ECDIS)

    ELECTRONIC CHART DISPLAY & INFORMATION SYSTEM 2012 EDITION

    (Course Description)

     

    Scope

     

    This model course intends to provide the knowledge, skill and understanding of ECDIS and electronic charts to the thorough extent needed to safely navigate vessels whose primary means of navigation is ECDIS.  The course emphasizes both the application and learning of ECDIS in a variety of underway contexts.

     

    The course is designed to meet the STCW requirements in the use of ECDIS, as revised by the 2010 Manila Amendments, specifically as these apply to Tables A-II/1, A-II/2 and A-II/3 and also to revised guidelines pertaining to training and assessment in the operational use of ECDIS in Table B-I (paragraphs 36 through 66), assessment in navigational watchkeeping and evaluation, of competence, both in Table B-II.

     

    It should be understood that this is a generic course which requires a structured and complementary on-board ship specific ECDIS familiarization for each shipboard ECDIS system on which the navigating officers serves.

     

    Objective

     

    Those who successfully complete this course should be able to demonstrate sufficient knowledge skill and understanding of ECDIS navigation and electronic charts to undertake the duties of a navigational watch officer defined by STCW Code, as amended.  This knowledge, and skill and understanding should include Column 1 ECDIS competencies of Tables A-II/1, A-II/2, and A-II/3, but is not limited to:

     

    In particular, there will be;

     

    • Knowledge of the capability and limitations of ECDIS operations, and all indicated sub-topics

    • Proficiency in operation, interpretation, and analysis of information obtained from ECDIS, and all indicated sub-topics

    • Management of operational procedures, system files and data, and all indicated sub-topics

     

    Entry Standards

     

    It is assumed that trainees undertaking this course have accomplished some formal instruction in Terrestrial Navigation, have at minimum some familiarization with visual navigation, have accomplished a period of supervised bridge watch-keeping duties, and have prior completion of basic radar/ARPA (MC 1.07).  Trainees should also have considerable familiarization with personal computing operating systems, keyboards and mice or trackballs.

     

    Graduates of Bachelor of Science in Marine Transportation programs shall be considered compliant with this provision.

     

    Course Certificate, diploma or document

     

    Documentary evidence shall be issued to those who have successfully completed this course indicating that the holder has completed training in the navigational use and operation of Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS) based on this model course. The type of ECDIS used in the conduct of practical exercises shall be indicated in the Course Certificate.

     

    Course delivery

     

    The outcome of this course may be achieved through various methods, including simulation-based classroom and laboratory training, or in-service training, or combinations of these methods, such that each trainee is provided access to an ECDIS with Electronic Navigation Chart (ENC) data for all required hours of practice and assessment in a controlled visual underway navigational environment

     

     

    Course intake limitations

     

    The maximum number of trainees should depend on the facilities and equipment available, bearing in mind the scope and objectives of the course.

     

    The instructor-trainee ratio shall be limited to 1:12.  When a class size exceeds 12 trainees, an assistant instructor is required.

     

    Staff requirements

     

    The following are the minimum qualifications recommended for instructors delivering a course that follows the IMO Model Course 1.27.  The instructor in charge should:

     

    .1 be a holder of a valid Professional Regulatory Commission (PRC) identification card  as marine deck officer;

     

    .2 have successfully completed an approved 2012 edition ECDIS course compliant with the STCW Code 2010 Manila Amendments;

     

    .3 have completed type specific familiarization training relevant to the equipment used for training. The type specific familiarization training maybe acquired from any of the following:

     

    1. Manufacturer, or

     

    2. Training center duly authorized by the Manufacturer, or

     

    3. Training center offering the relevant type-specific ECDIS training;

     

    .4 have a detailed knowledge of the requirements of SOLAS Chapter V/2, V/19, and V/27-20, as amended.

     

    .5 have an up-to-date knowledge of the IMO ECDIS Performance Standards currently in force and knowledge to relevant STCW requirements and guidance;

     

    .6 have an up-to-date knowledge of ENC’s;

     

    .7 be fully aware of current ENC date transfer standards and presentation libraries of the IHO, methods of ENC licensing and updating and current IMO recommendations on ECDIS software and other issues;

     

    .8 have a current relevant teaching qualification and have successfully completed a Training Course for Simulator Instructor, and assessor training (IMO Model Course

     

    3.12 and preferably, IMO Model Course 6.10), including the application of simulators in training and meets the requirements of STCW regulation I/6 and I/12.

     

    Assistant instructor should have similar relevant knowledge of ECDIS operation.

     

    Teaching facilities and equipment

     

    ECDIS simulation equipment must meet all applicable performance standards set out in Regulation I/12 of the STCW Convention and also should meet the guidance in Section B-I/12, STCW Code, as amended.  An example of equipment set up for ECDIS training has been provided in Appendix 6 of IMO Model Course 1.27 which shall include the following, but not limited to:

     

    An integrated bridge system consisting of:

     

    • One (1) PC System for ECDIS

    • One (1) PC System for Radar / ARPA

    • One (1) PC System for Visual and Conning

     

    The work station to student ratio shall not be more than 1:2.

     

    ECDIS Classroom/Lab:

     

    The lecture portion of the course can take place in any suitable classroom with desk/seating space for all trainees.  Standard classroom facilities must be available such as whiteboard/ chalkboard appropriate projection system, hypermedia equipment, etc.

     

    The practical demonstration and assessment portion of the course must take place in a space (1.5 sqm per trainee) equipped to provide a suitable ECDIS simulator work station for each individual trainee (equipment to student ratio shall be 1:2). The necessity of mounting display monitors on the desk surfaces requires careful placement of all equipment and projection screens to maintain good visibility for all trainees.

     

     

    In addition to the trainee work stations there must be an instructor station with dedicated projection system that will allow projection of the exercises and lecture materials.  It is strongly recommended that there be display(s) networked to the instructor station, thereby allowing displays of ARPA and ECDIS information (or other training material) for the benefit of the trainees.

     

    Note that the lecturing may take place in the same room as the simulation if the space is suitable.  This would require adequate visibility around/over the work stations to the whiteboard/chalkboard and projection screens, and adequate work space for taking notes and written examinations.

     

     

  • Engine Room Management (ERM)

  • Engine Room Simulator with ERM (with Practical Assessment)  (ERS w/ ERM)

    ENGINE ROOM SIMULATOR FOR RATINGS

    (Course Description)

     

    In keeping with the latest development thrust in seafarer’s competency, some maritime concerned groups has recommended a series of innovations through new concerns primarily on subject areas like Simulators, Basic Engine Principles and Operations, Understanding on different and parameters, General Safe working Practices and Familiarization of all Engine Machineries and Auxiliaries. This course is designed to help our seafarers meet the provisions for “hands-on” training and to develop basic skills through use of simulators required in their certificate of competency.

     

    OBJECTIVES

     

    At the end of the course the trainees should be able to:

     

    • understand the basic principles and operations of all engine machinery and its auxiliaries

    • identify the different measurement and instrumentation as their aid in the engine logbook entries

    • participate on the different engine hands-on simulations which is an integral part of their competence

    • lists the duties and responsibilities of engine ratings necessary in the interest of the safety of life and property and adhere to the rules and regulations purposely laid for the prevention of sea pollution from ships.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    This course is designed to help our seafarers meet the provisions for “hands-on” training and to develop basic skills through use of simulators required in their certificate of competency. It is hoped that thus training course will meet the purpose for which it is intended.

     

    CERTIFICATE

     

    With the use of Engine Room Simulator and for having been assessed by a qualified assessor in accordance with the approved method and criteria.

     

    TOPICS INCLUDED:

    Rules and regulations, watchkeeping, measurement and instrumentations, marine fuel oil handling, familiarization or simulator and all engine auxiliaries.

  • Engine Team Management (ETM)

    ENGINE TEAM MANAGEMENT

    (Course Description)

     

     

    This training program deals with team management in highly operational situations, for example on board ship’s engine rooms and in control rooms of power plants.

     

    It is a fact that the way human beings interact, communicate and make decisions in such situations is quite similar.  So management errors are also similar.  The base for this course was developed in the airline industry as a result of research, which showed that most accidents are caused not by technical errors but by crew management errors.

     

    Lack of competence is actually a minor reason for accidents.

     

    This is also true for shipping.  Seven major maritime organizations and SAS Flight Academy joined to convert an airline pilot training program to this program for ship officers, maritime pilots and engineers.

     

    A questionnaire was sent out to seven hundred mariners, and over three hundred replies were received.  Their input helped in the design of this course.

     

    So, where are we heading?  What kind of behavior are we looking for as a result of this course? Well, research shows that successful teams exposed to critical situations perform as follows:

    • They have good situation awareness – which are they anticipating each next condition.

    • They obtain relevant information early.

    • They build a shared mental model of the situation.

    • They use cautious, safe strategies and keep options open as long as possible.

    • Their decisions are realistic and sensitive to constraints.

    • They share workload.

    • They monitor progress by cross-checking each other.

     

    Such performance is one of the main objectives of Engine Team Management training.

     

    We also believe that the principles of how you manage a highly operational situation with a team of skilled individuals are the same for personnel categories such as:

    • Maritime pilots

    • Navigating officers

    • Engineers,

     

    And for all vessel types, for example:

    • Tankers

    • High speed vessels

    • Large passenger ferries

    • Container ships

    • Navy vessels.

     

    During the course, you will be reviewing several cases of accidents and incidents at sea, proving the points we have highlighted in this course.  The case studies chosen have been selected for their suitability in that respect, and because documentation concerning them has been easily available.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    • The trainees who successfully complete this course will gain experience in handling ships under various conditions and will make a more effective contribution to the engine team during ship maneuvering.

    • To assist the ship’s master and chief engineer manage the vessel’s bridge and engine team for each voyage so personnel are rested, trained and prepared to handle any situation.

    • To help recognize workloads demands and other risk factor that may affect decisions in setting watch conditions.

    • To ensure engine team members are trained and aware of their responsibilities.

    • To help bridge and engine team members interact with a support to the chief engineer.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    This training course program is open to shipboard personnel of merchant ship of any type under operational or management level of the engine department.

     

    COURSE CERTIFICATE

     

    On successful completion of this course, a document will be issued certifying that the holder has successfully completed the entire course.

     

    COURSE INTAKE LIMITATIONS

     

    The number of participant per each class shall not exceed 24 persons to allow each trainee to benefit from the emphasis of the course.

  • ENGINE WATCHKEEPING (EWK)

    RATINGS FORMING PART OF AN ENGINEERING WATCH

    (Course Description)

     

    This course covers the mandatory minimum training requirements for certification of ratings prescribed by Regulation II/4 paragraph 2 (2.2) Section A – III/4 paragraph 2 of the International Convention on Standard of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW 78) as amended.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    After successfully completing this course you will be knowledgeable in:

    • efficiently operate the GMDSS equipment and have primary responsibility for radio communications during distress incidents

    • techniques to avoid the unintentional transmission of false distress alerts and the procedures to use in order to mitigate the effects of false distress alerts following unintentional transmission

     

    CERTIFICATE

     

    As authorized by the Maritime Training Council pursuant to the provisions of MTC Resolution No. 03, series of 1998 and for having been assessed by a qualified assessor in accordance with the approved method and criteria.

     

    INSTRUCTORS QUALIFICATION

     

    1. Must be a holder of Certificate of Instructors Course IMO Model Course 6.09

    2. Knowledgeable of the course program

    3. Qualified in the task for which training is being conducted. Marine Engineer Officer 1 year sea experience on board vessels with at least 750 KW main propulsion plant in that capacity.

     

     

  • General Operation Certificates / GMDSS (GOC/GMDSS)

    GOC FOR GMDSS

    (Course Description)

     

    This course covers the training recommended in Annex 3 of IMO Assembly Resolution A. 703(17): Training of Radio Operations related to the General Operators Certificate (GOC).

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    A Trainee successfully completing this course and passing the prescribed examination will be enabled to efficiently operate the GMDSS equipment, and to have a primary responsibility for radio communications during incidents of distress. Given the severe problems being experienced in the GMDSS as a result of the large number of false distress alerts that now occur, training will also be provided in techniques to avoid unintentional transmission of false distress alerts and the procedures to be use in order to migrate the effects of false distress alerts following unintentional transmission.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    This course is open to all experienced Deck and Radio Officers who posses the following qualifications:

     

    1. He must be at least 21 years of age.

    2. He must be a licensed Deck/Radio Officer.

    3. If a graduate BSECE of licensed ECE, he must have one (1) shipboard experience on board ocean-giving vessels as electrician or radio electronic trainee.

     

    COURSE CERTIFICATION, DIPLOMA OR DOCUMENT

     

    The Training Center shall issue a certificate of completion to the trainee who successfully passes the course/module which certificate is a pre-requisite for taking the GOC licensure examination given by National Telecommunications Commission.

     

    Provided that the trainee passes the licensure examination, which shall consist of written and oral parts plus a practical demonstration (performed on live equipment realistic simulation equipment where this is applicable.) as prescribed by the National Telecommunications Communication, a General Operators Certificate, in accordance with the provisions of the Radio Regulations of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and the SYCW ’95 Convention, Regulation IV/2, may be issued. The practical examination should be supervised by an external, objective examiner from the National Telecommunications Communication or any NTC duly appointed/recognized representative from other accredited training center. It is recommended that practical examinations should be performed on live equipment, but the National Telecommunications can consider the use of realistic simulation equipment where this is applicable.

     

    COURSE INTAKE LIMITATIONS

     

    The numbers of trainees must meet the required student-to-laboratory equipment “ratio” of 5-6 students per group during the practical training or laboratory work for maximum of 12 students and must not exceed a total number of 24 students for theoretical.

  • Hazarous Material Training Course (in compliance with US DOT Regulations) (H/CFR)

    HAZMAT W/ CFR

    (Course Description)

     

    Training as used in this subpart means a systematic program that ensures a hazmat employee has familiarity with the general provisions of this subchapter, is able to recognize and identify hazardous materials, has knowledge of specific requirements of this subchapter applicable to functions performed by the employee, and has knowledge of emergency response information, self-protection measures and accident prevention methods and procedures (see § 172.704).

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    The purpose of this course is to ensure awareness and promote safety among employees who may be involved in the transport of hazardous materials. The objective is to ensure that employees operate in the safest possible manner in situations where contact with potentially hazardous materials is likely.

    At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:

     

    • Identify the proper shipping methods for hazardous materials in air, water, and land.

    • Recognize information needed on shipping papers for specific types of hazardous wastes

    • Utilize proper labeling, marking, and placarding required for hazardous waste transportation

    • Develop information gathering techniques needed for required incident reporting and emergency notification

    • Show understanding of the documentation for shipping papers and manifests.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    The course is open to those being trained to serve as master, deck officer, ratings and shore base personnel those who are for individuals who manage hazardous materials in their job. This includes employees who:

     

    • Load, unload, and handle hazardous materials;

    • Select, mark, label, or modify containers or packaging;

    • Prepare materials for shipping;

    • Prepare shipping papers;

    • Prepare stowage and segregation of dangerous substance;

    • Are responsible for the safety of hazardous materials during shipment; and

    • Operate vehicles.

     

    CERTIFICATE

     

    On successful completion of the course, a certificate or diploma should be issued, attesting that the holder has successfully completed a course on 49 CFR Part 172.704.

     

    Students must pass a graded final exam with a score of 75% or better.

     

     

    COURSE INTAKE LIMITATION

     

    The number of trainees should not normally exceed twenty four (24).

     

     

  • House Keeping (H)

  • Hydraulics / Pneumatics (H/P)

  • International Safety Management CODE (ISM)

    INTERNATIONAL SAFETY MANAGEMENT

    (Course Description)

     

    This course is adopted by the Organization by Resolution A. 741(18), as maybe amended by the Organization, provided that such amendments are adopted, brought into force and take effect in accordance with the provisions of Article VIII of the present convention concerning the amendment procedures applicable to the annex other than Chapter I.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    A trainee successfully completing this In house course will be able to know the purpose and objectives of the ISM Code including the 16 sections, preamble, role of a seafarer and reasons to adopt this course.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    This course is open to all shipboard personnel of merchant ships of any type, no other formal qualifications are required.

     

    CERTIFICATE

     

    A certificate of completion will be issued to the trainees upon completion of the course, certifying that he/she has completed the training program.

     

    COURSE INTAKE

     

    The number of participants per class shall not exceed 24 persons to allow each trainee to benefit from the emphasis of the course.

  • Maritime English (ME)

    MARITIME ENGLISH

    (Course Description)

     

    The course is designed primarily for all shipboard personnel. It deals with the use of Standard Marine Communication Phrases, vocabulary and technical terms used in the maritime environment. It also includes oral and written communication using General English maritime correspondence and technical writing. The course utilizes maritime related topics and issues as springboard for some activities.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    The principal aim of the course is to develop among Filipino seafarers, awareness on the significance of Maritime English in the promotion of marine safety and environmental protection.

     

    Participants who successfully complete the training course will be able to speak English in the best manner they could with confidence that leads to fluency. They will be able to understand the use and purpose of the Standard Marine Communication Phrases.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    All shipboard personnel, inexperienced applicant to board the vessel, and those working within the field of maritime industry who would like to enhance their oral and written communication skills in English and the SMCP, may enroll in the course.

     

    CERTIFICATE

     

    Upon successful completion of the requirements of the course, the participant/trainees will be issued a Certificate of Completion.

     

    COURSE INTAKE/STUDENT NUMBER LIMITATION

     

    The number of participants per training session shall not exceed 24 persons to allow each trainee to benefit from the course.

  • Maritime Law (ML)

    MARITIME LAW

    (Course Description)

     

    This training course program provides ship officers an in-depth knowledge regarding commercial law affecting the merchant shipping operations as well as other legal requirements governing the maritime sector.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    This course is designed to update and broaden trainees’ knowledge and understanding or maritime law and is firmly oriented towards rules governing relationships incident to merchant shipping considered as a transport activity. The main objective is to impart knowledge of the new and revised global laws, regulations, and standards concerning shipping.

     

    As the outcome, trainees will have a comprehensive view of existing and pending international regulations as well as developments relating to this field. Trainees will have a greater awareness of their legal duties and responsibilities concerning modern ship and cargo operations and will have a proper understanding of, and sufficient acquaintance with, the general development process within the scope of contemporary shipping law. They will be better able to make decisions related to the shipowners’ obligations and liabilities and will be aware not only of the content of international regulations but also how to find legal rules, how to find out if the rules have been changed, and how effective they are, especially in changing circumstances.

     

    A subsidiary objective is to provide a foundation in maritime law, which will form a basis for continued learning to take account of changes which will take place in this sphere.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    This course is open to masters and officers of merchant ships of any type. No other formal qualifications are required.

     

    COURSE CERTIFICATE, DIPLOMA OR DOCUMENT

     

    On successful completion of the course and active participation in group work, a document should be issued certifying that the holder has completed a course of training in maritime law for ship’s officers.

     

     

  • Medical Care (MECA)

    MEDICAL CARE

    (Course Description)

     

    In accordance with Paragraph 3 of section 17 of the IMO/ILO Document of Guidance, 1985, this advanced level of medical training, based on the use of International Medical Guide for Ships (IMGS) or similar national medical guide, enables as specified crew member or members to participate effectively in coordinated schemes for medical assistance on ships at sea and to provide the sick or injured with a satisfactory standard of medical care while they remain on board. The course reflects the requirements of first aid and medical care as specified in appendix 3 of section 17 of the IMO/ILO Document for Guidance, 1985.

     

    Where practicable, this training may include practical training at a hospital or similar establishment.

    The 1978 STCW Convention specifies in paragraph 13 of the appendix to regulation II/2 that masters and chief mates of ships of 200 gross register tons more should have a thorough knowledge of the use of the contents of IMGS or an equivalent national publication.

     

    OBJECTIVES

    Successful completion of this course should enable candidates to participate effectively in coordinated schemes for medical assistance on ships at sea and to provide the sick or injured with a satisfactory standard of medical care while they remain on board.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

    The course is open to masters and chief mates of ships of 200 gross register tons or more who are required by paragraph 13 of the appendix to regulation II/2 of the STCW Convention to have a thorough knowledge of the use of the contents of International Medical Guide for Ships or an equivalent national publication.

     

    Those entering the course should have successfully completed the intermediate level (medical training) course as specified in the IMO/ILO Document for Guidance, 1985. The course is also open to seafarers who have previously completed the Medical Care training course and wish to comply with the recommendation in the IMO/ILO course should be undertaken at intervals of approximately five years.

     

    COURSE CERTIFICATE, DIPLOMA OR DOCUMENT

    Provided that the course has been approved by the Administration, a trainee who successfully completes it may be completed the course and satisfied the medical care requirements specified in paragraph 13 of the appendix to regulation II/2 STCW Convention and in the IMO/ILO Document for Guidance, 1985.

     

    COURSE INTAKE LIMITATIONS

    Course intake should be limited so that for practical instruction and demonstrations there are no more than six trainees to each instructor.

  • Medical Emergency First Aid (MEFA)

    MEDICAL EMERGENCY FIRST AID

    (Course Description)

     

    This model course aims to provide the training for candidates to provide medical first aid on board ship, in accordance with Section A-VI/4 of the STCW Code.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    This Syllabus covers the requirements of the 1995 STCW Convention Chapter VI, Section A-VI/4, and Table A-VI/4-1. On meeting the minimum standard of competence in medical first aid, a trainee will be competent to apply immediate first aid in the event of accident or illness on board.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    For admission to the course seafarers should have completed IMO Model Course No. 1.13, Elementary First Aid or attained a similar standard in elementary first aid.

     

    COURSE CERTIFICATE

     

    On successful completion of the course and demonstration of competence, a document may be issued that the holder has met standard of competence specified in Table A-VI/4-1 of STCW 1995.

     

    A certificate may be issued only by centers approved by the Administration.

     

    COURSE INTAKE LIMITATIONS

     

    The maximum number of trainees attending each session will depend on the availability of instructors, equipment and facilities available for conducting the training. It should not exceed six trainees per instructor.

  • PADAMS (PADAMS)

    PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE IN THE MARITIME SECTOR

    (Course Description)

     

    This course is intended to increase awareness among seafarers on the nature and extent of alcohol and drug problems in the maritime sector particularly among officers and ratings on board, and the preventive measures and policies to address such problems.

     

    OBJECTIVES

     

    With this material, trainers will be able to provide working knowledge of the main components of the alcohol and rug problems, including an understanding of the implications of alcohol and drug abuse for fellow seafarers, the family, shipping companies, manning agencies, and countries; appreciation of the importance of the effects of alcoholic beverages on their behavior in the work place or elsewhere; and increased compliance with pertinent laws, policies and regulations.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    Merchant marine officers, ratings and cadets are the primary targets of this program, which is aimed at the reduction and prevention of alcohol and drug related problems on board. However, the same program may be extended to individuals or representatives of agencies involved in the education, recruitment, selection, training and development of maritime manpower.

     

    COURSE CERTIFICATE

     

    A certificate of completion may be issued to the trainee upon completion of the course, certifying that he/she has exceeded the knowledge required of the program.

     

    COURSE INTAKE LIMITATIONS

     

    The total number of trainees should not be more than 30 and the small study groups should be composed of four to five trainees.

     

     

  • Radar Navigation, Radar Plotting & Use of ARPA (ROPA)

    RADAR NAVIGATION, RADAR PLOTTING AND USE OF ARPA

    (Course Description)

     

    This course provides training in the basic theory and use of radar for officers in charge of a navigational watch. It is based on the guidance on training in radar observation and plotting and in the operational use of ARPA in Section B-1/12 of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, as amended. This model course aims to meet the minimum training standards in Table A-II/1 of the 2010 Manila Amendments to the STCW Convention and Codes. This guidance supersedes the recommendations annexed to Resolutions A.482 (XII) and A.483 (XII) adopted by IMO in 1981.

     

    This model course aims to meet the mandatory minimum requirements for knowledge, understanding and proficiency in Table A-11/1 of the 2010 Manila Amendments to the STCW Convention and Codes. The aspects covered include the theory necessary to understand how radar information is obtained and displayed, the limitations and accuracy of that information, the formation and recognition of unwanted responses, the correct use of operational controls to obtain an optimal display and checks on performance of the set.

     

    The various modes of display available and the choice of a suitable mode for a particular application are covered, together with the effect that changes in the course or speed of “own” or target ship have on the appearance of the display.

     

    The course also covers the recognition of critical targets, the measurement of bearings and distances, and the use of these for fixing the ship’s position and maintaining a plot of the movement of other ships as an aid to collision avoidance. Exercises in the application of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREG) make use of the resulting plots.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    A trainee successfully completing this course and meeting the required performance standards will recognize when radar should be in use; will select a suitable mode and range setting for the circumstances; will be able to set the controls for optimal performance; and will be aware of the limitations of the equipment in detecting targets and in terms of accuracy.

     

    When within range of the coast, the trainee will be able to compare the radar display with the chart, select suitable conspicuous land targets and use these targets to fix his position.

     

    The trainee will also be aware of the need to maintain a continuing plot of ship targets which may pose a potential threat of collision; and he will be able to derive from the plot the necessary information about other ships’ courses, speeds and nearest approaches to enable action to be taken in ample time, in accordance with COLREG to prevent a close-quarters situation arising.

     

    ENTRY STANDARD

     

    This course is principally intended for candidates for certification as officers on charge of a navigational watch. Before entering the course, trainees should have completed a minimum period of six months at sea and preferably have gained some experience of bridge watchkeeping.

     

    Trainee officers for certification as officer in charge of a navigational watch should have completed, or be following a planned and structured programme of training. Shipboard training should include tasks or projects relating to bridge work and watchkeeping duties. instructors may find evidence of the standard attained by trainees in the prospective officer’s training record book.

     

    The course would also be of value to others using radar, e.g. those working in such craft as harbour and customs patrol launches, in which case the entry standards may be adjusted to suit the particular circumstances. However, the intake of trainees for each course should normally have similar backgrounds.

     

    CERTIFICATION

     

    On successful completion of the course and assessments, a document may be issued certifying that the holder has successfully completed a course of training which meets or exceeds the level of knowledge and competence specified in Table A-II/1 of STCW Code.

     

    INSTRUCTORS QUALIFICATION

     

    1. Must be a holder of Certificate of Instructors Course 6.09

    2. Knowledgeable of the course program

    3. Qualified in the task for which training is being conducted. At least a Marine Deck Officer with 2 years sea going experience on board ocean going vessel of at least 500 gross tonnage in that capacity.

    4. If conducting training with use of simulator, should have received appropriate guidance in instructional techniques involving the use of simulators and gained practical operational experience on the particular type of simulator being used.

  • Radar Simulator Course (RSC)

    RADAR SIMULATOR

    (Course Description)

     

    This course consists of theoretical part but however is essentially practical and consists of a series of exercises performed on a radar simulator with the trainees using “own ships” and number of target vessels controlled by the instructor. Exercises of increasing complexity will be set to provide realistic practice in the use of radar for navigation and collision avoidance in confined waters with heavy traffic.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    Those successfully completing this course will be able to make efficient and effective use of radar as a navigational aid in congested, confined waters, recognize potential threats and make valid navigational and collision avoidance decisions based on sound radar observation and plotting in compliance with the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea.

     

    COURSE CERTIFICATE, DIPLOMA OR DOCUMENT

     

    As Authorized by the Maritime Training Council pursuant to the provisions of MTC Resolution No. 03, series of 1998 and for having been assessed by a qualified assessor in accordance with the approved method and criteria.

     

    INCLUDED TOPICS

     

    • Familiarization with Simulator’s “Own Ship” Characteristics and Controls

    • Review of Basic Radar and Plotting

    • Open Water Exercises in the Application of COLREG 1972

    • Exercises in Navigation and Collision Avoidance in Confined and Congested Waters

    • Exercises in and near Traffic Separation Schemes

    • Final Assessment

  • Route Planning with Chart Correction (RPCC)

    ROUTE PLANNING WITH CHART CORRECTION

    (Course Description)

     

    SCOPE

     

    The course is essentially practical and consists of a series of exercises performed on a classroom with charts and nautical equipments. Trainees will act as navigating officer, checking all charts affected in a voyage, then applying chart correction before planning route.

     

    As the course progresses, exercises of various possible scenarios will be set to provide realistic practice in the use of navigational equipment. Each exercise will begin with briefing instructions about the given scenario, and then followed by practical application of chart correction from admiralty notice to mariners. After each exercise, each participant will demonstrate the procedures he applied in a given exercise – discussions will follow giving participants the opportunity to analyze the actions taken and discuss possible alternatives.

     

    AIM

     

    To provide knowledge and background in having an effective route planning and chart correction technique.

     

     

    COURSE OBJECTIVE

     

    On the completion of the training course, the participants shall have a thorough knowledge and understandings of a route planning from berth to berth and the proper correction of navigational chart and publications.

     

     

    SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE

     

    A participant successfully completing this course shall be able to:

     

    1. learn the use of appropriate tools on chart correction.

    2. Understand and apply the proper procedure in correcting Admiralty charts and publications.

    3. understand and apply correction of weekly notices on to the charts.

    4. Adopt a degree of professionalism in the recording and filing of all documents required in chart correction.

    5. Monitor and update all navigational charts and publications when new editions are published.

     

    ENTRY STANDARD

     

    Those who intend to take this course should preferably be deck officers who are assuming or about to assume the post of a navigating officer.

     

    COURSE CERTIFICATE

     

    On successful completion of this course, a document should be issued certifying that the holder has successfully completed a course on chart correction the admiralty way and route planning.

     

    COURSE INTAKE LIMITATIONS

     

    Course intake should be limited to a maximum of 12 participants for each session.

     

    STAFF REQUIREMENTS

     

    The instructor is preferably a deck officer who acted as navigating officer with adequate background and experience in navigating worldwide trade.

    He should also have background in correcting charts of different areas and thoroughly familiar with application of all nautical publications involve in chart correction.

     

    TEACHING FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT

     

    The BA charts, publications and tools for chart correcting. At least 12 participants, or three persons per group who will carry out chart corrections and lay out route planning on charts.

     

    Passage plan format will be filled out in accordance with IMO recommendations.

    A room equipped with an overhead projector and a whiteboard should be provided for briefing trainees before exercises are carried out and holding group discussions following each exercise.

  • Ship Simulator Bridge Teamwork with BRM (with Practical Assessment (SSBT w/ BRM)

    SSBT with BRM

    (Course Description)

     

    Scope

     

    This course is practical and theoretical and consists of a series of exercises performed on a ship simulator. Classroom lectures, to provide the necessary theoretical background for the exercises, are included. Particular items dealt with in these lectures are illustrated either by including them as part of an exercise or by a separate simulator demonstration. Bridge teamwork is dealt with either as interactive Computer Based Training (CBT) or lecture.

     

    Exercises are controlled by an instructor and, initially, allow the trainees to become familiar with the equipment, the controls and the instrumentation provided by the simulator.

     

    The exercises increase in complexity as the course progresses and as trainees become familiar with the maneuvering characteristics of the ship model and its response to the engine and helm in various conditions. The final exercises deal with the planning and execution of a costal passage from port to port and will make use of the knowledge and skills learned in all of the previous exercises. Equipment failure or malfunction will be introduced during the later exercises to afford trainees practice in taking emergency preventive action and to practice on bridge teamwork in critical situations.

     

    During exercises, trainees are expected to make use of effective bridge procedures, to comply with International regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972 (COLREG 1972) and to observe the basic principles of keeping a navigational watch, as set out in regulation VIII/2, section A-VIII/2 and B-VII/2 of the STCW ’78 as amended 2010 Convention and Code. They will assume the different roles of the bridge watchkeeping team, the roles being rotated to allow each trainee an opportunity to act as master for some of the exercises.

     

    Each exercise will be preceded by a session for briefing and planning and be followed by a debriefing.

     

    Objective

     

    The trainees who successfully complete this course will have gained experience in handling ships under various conditions and will make a more effective contribution to the bridge team during maneuvering in normal and emergency situations. This course develops the behavioral dynamics and teamwork between deck officers in the use and coordination of knowledge, experience and available resources to achieve standard of safety at sea.

     

    In particular, trainees will gain:

     

     Familiarization with the use of engines and helm for ship maneuvering;

     An understanding of the effects on the behavior of the ship with the effect of wind, current, shallow water, banks and narrow channels and condition of loading;

     A greater awareness of the importance of planning a passage or maneuver and the need for an alternative plan;

     A greater understanding and awareness of efficient bridge procedures and bridge teamwork during watchkeeeping and ship handling, in normal and in emergency situations;

     A greater awareness and understanding of a good interactive communication style and benefit of building up a common shared model of the planned passage.

     

    Entry standards

     

    This course is open to all deck officers.

    Those wishing to enter this course should have experience in watchkeeping duties and should be able to practice all usual tasks concerning standard navigational procedures and equipment. They should know the International regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972 (COLREG 1972) and the functions and limitations of the navigational equipments.

     

    Course certificate, diploma or document

     

    Upon completion of the training course and assessments result shows that the trainees are capable to perform the watch duties in ship handling and bridge teamwork to maintain the safety of navigation in accordance with the requirement of STCW 1978 as amended in 2010 Chapter VIII, Reg. VIII/2, section A-VIII/2 and B-VII/2, a certificate of completion are issued to indicate that the holder successfully completed the training program.

     

    Course intake limitations

     

    The course intake will, to some extent, be dependent on the facilities provided by the simulator and the number of qualified instructors available. To allow each trainee to spend a reasonable proportion of the time engaged in exercises, the intake should be limited to two bridge teams, each consisting of three or four persons. Typically, one team would be carrying out an exercise while the other is being lectured, debriefed or planning the next exercise. The two teams are identified as Group A and Group B in the timetables.

     

    When recruiting trainees for this course, consideration should be given to their length of watchkeeping experience and the sizes and types of ship for which they require training, so that persons with widely differing experience and training needs are not in the same group.

     

    Staff requirements

     

    The course should normally conduct by a Management Level Deck Officer with adequate knowledge and practical experience in ship handling and maneuvering, all instructors should have theoretical knowledge of the hydrodynamic of the ships behavior beyond that required by STCW 2010 amendment and a holder of the following certificates:

    1. Training Course for Instructor IMO Model Course 6.09

    2. Simulator Instructor Training Course under Reg. I/12 of STCW Code

    3. Training Course for Assessment and Certification of Seafarer IMO Model Course 3.12

    4. SAS Bridge Resource Management Workshop Leader (or equivalent)

     

    Teaching facilities and equipment

     

    This course requires a ship handling simulator with a fully equipped bridge, including instruments showing course, speed, rudder angle, rate of return, engine RPM and propeller pitch and relative wind direction and speed. Whenever possible, the model in use should be of similar size and maneuvering characteristics to the ships in which trainees will serve. The models must generate realistic responses to the use of engine and rudder under various conditions. Special attention should be drawn to slow speed situations. The simulator must have a visual system capable of handing a number of ships in addition to land masses. The simulator must generate realistic radar signals ‘and echo soundings and simulate or emulate navigations receivers providing at least one alternative means of fixing position.

     

    Maneuvering information, in the form set out in IMO Assembly resolution A.601 (15), should be provided for the model in use. The bridge should be equipped with a simulated VHF telephone, connected to the instructor station, for communicating with pilot stations, station in answering or initiating calls. Similarly, an internal telephone to the engine room should be connected to the instructor’s station.

     

    Means of producing the sound signals required by COLREG 1972 must be provided for other ships in the vicinity as well as for own ship.

     

    Adjacent to the simulator there should be a room where briefing and debriefing may be held. Preferably, there should be a wall projector showing the scenario as it is seen from the instructor station. The room should be suitable for displaying charts on the walls and have an overhead projector and a whiteboard. Video recording and playback facilities may also be useful.

     

    There should be a room where lecturing may be held. Preferably, each trainee should have a personal computer equipped with Bridge Resource Management interactive CBT program (or equivalent products).

  • Shipboard Safety Officer (SBSO)

    SHIPBOARD SAFETY OFFICER COURSE

     

    This course is primarily intended for all Deck Officers and Engine Officers who will be responsible for the implementation, maintenance, monitoring and enhancement of “safety” on board the ship in general terms.

     

    The course can be considered as providing comprehensive shipboard safety officer training for deck officers and engine officers who shall be designated as the ship’s Safety Officer.

     

    The topic covered should serve as a valuable introduction for those who have little experience as ship’s Safety Officer and also as a very useful refresher for the experienced ones. Furthermore, it will serve as an eye-opener on the sensitive roles/functions of a Shipboard Safety Officer.

     

    In the introductory part, the course reviews the ISM code, its objectives and its requirements in order to maintain safe and efficient shipping on clean oceans.

     

    In its subsequent parts, the course deals with the Safety Management System in general, its elaborated contents, and its main purpose in the enhancement of safety standards in the ship’s day-to-day operations.

     

    The main part of the course deals with the duties and responsibilities of a Shipboard Safety Officer were some of which has been forgotten and / or taken for granted due to lack awareness on its importance.

     

    Further, the course covers actual risk assessment, identifying causal factors and accident investigation, hazards spotting, auditing of unsafe practices, and conducting safety inspections in detail.

     

    OBJECTIVES

     

    The coverage of this course serves the purpose of providing the knowledge and understanding towards the Safety Officer’s role in the areas of:

    • Basic Safety Concepts

    • Safety Management

    • Shipboard Safety Awareness

    The course also serves the purpose of developing the skills in the activities designated to a Safety Officer such as:

    • Hazard Monitoring

    • Risk Assessment

    • Unsafe Acts Monitoring

    • Accident, incident, near accident, and non-conformity monitoring and reporting

    • Safety statistics and root cause analysis

    • Capability to recommend solutions towards safety

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    In general terms, those wishing to enter this course should be experienced Deck and Engine Officers, but most applies to Management Level Deck Officers and Engine Officers with great responsibilities on board ships. However, taking the course can be an advantage to aspiring Deck and Engine Officers.

     

    CERTIFICATE

     

    On completion of the course – if assessment which indicates the participants’ usefulness as prospective Safety Officer can be made a document may be issued certifying that the holder has successfully completed the training course for shipboard safety officer.

     

    STUDENT NUMBER LIMITATION

     

    The intake of participants should approximately be 9 to 12 to allow about three or four in each group of three. This will allow each trainee to benefit fully from the participative emphasis of the course. It is important that the number of experienced management level deck officers and engine officers is adequate to ensure that there is informed discussion in each working group.

  • Shiphandling & Maneuvering (Shiphandling)

    SHIPHANDLING AND MANUEVERING

    (Course Description)

     

    SCOPE

     

    The course is essentially practical and consists mainly of a series of exercises performed on a ship handling simulator. Some classroom lectures, to provide the necessary theoretical background for the exercises, are included. Particular items dealt with in these lectures are illustrated either by including them as part of an exercises or by a separate simulator demonstration.

     

    Exercises are controlled by an instructor and initially, allow the trainees to become familiar with the equipment, the controls and the instrumentation provided by the simulator.

     

    The exercises increase in complexity as the course progresses and as trainees become familiar with the maneuvering characteristics of the ship model and its response to the engine and helm in various conditions. The final exercises deal with the planning and execution of as coastal passage from port to port and will make use of the knowledge and skills learned in all of the previous exercises. Equipment failure or malfunction may be introduced during an exercise to afford trainees practice in taking emergency remedial action.

     

    During exercises, trainees are expected to make use of effective bridge procedures, to comply with the International regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972 (COLREG 1972), to observe the basic principles of keeping a navigational watch, as set out in regulation II/1 of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, as amended, and to be familiar with the maneuvering characteristics of the vessel and perform tests as stated in the  IMO Resolution A.751(18), INTERIM STANDARDS FOR SHIP MANEUVERABILITY.

     

    Each exercise will be preceded by a session for briefing and planning and be followed by a group discussion, led by the instructor, to analyze the actions and decisions of the trainees.

     

    It is a fact that the way human beings interact, communicate and make decisions in such situations are quite similar. So management errors are also similar. The course was developed as a result of research, which showed that most accidents are caused not by technical errors but by lack of competence and confidence in shiphandling.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    The trainees who successfully complete this course will have gained experience in handling ships under various conditions and will make a more effective contribution to the bridge team during ship maneuvering.

     

    During this course, students will develop the knowledge and practical ability needed to be a ship handler. Topics include propulsion systems, ship maneuvering, anchoring, docking and undocking, emergency situations, ship pilots, ship and tug interaction, channel effects and maneuvering in restricted waters. Classroom lecture and the shiphandling simulator are used to the fulfillment of the requirement and standards of the course.

     

    In particular, trainees will gain:

    - familiarization with the use of engines and helm for ship maneuvering;

    - an understanding of the effects on the behavior of the ship of:

    • wind

    • current

    • shallow water, banks and narrow channels

    • condition of loading;

    - a greater awareness of the importance of planning a passage or maneuver and the need for an alternative plan; and

    - a greater understanding and awareness of efficient bridge procedures during ship handling

     

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    Trainees should be a deck officer (operational of management level)

     

    COURSE CERTIFICATE, DIPLOMA OR DOCUMENT

     

    A Certificate will be issued to those who have successfully completed this course indicating that the holder has completed a training.

     

    COURSE INTAKE LIMITATIONS

     

    The course intake will, to some extent, be dependent on the facilities provided by the simulator and the number of qualified instructors available. To allow each trainee to spend a reasonable proportion of the time engaged in exercises, the intake should be limited to two bridge teams, each consisting of three or four persons. Typically, one team would be carrying out an exercise while the other is being debriefed and planning the next exercises. The two teams are identified as Group A and Group B in the timetables.

     

    When recruiting trainees for this course, consideration should be given to their length of watchkeeping experience and the sizes and types of ship for which they require training, so that persons with widely differing experience and training needs are not in the same group.

     

    STAFF REQUIREMENTS

     

    The instructor in charge must be a duly Marine Deck Officer at the Management Level preferably a Master with  a minimum of two years experience in that capacity necessary to operate a ship handling simulator as a training aid. An additional instructor would be in help with similar qualifications and experience to supervise each group of trainees. All instructors should have a theoretical knowledge of the hydrodynamics of ship behavior beyond that required by STCW 1978, as amended. It is recommended that, in addition to receiving instruction in the operation of the simulator, instructors should have attended a course in the use of a simulation facility for training purposes and must be holder of Certificate of Instructor Course (IMO Model Course 6.09)

  • Steering Course (SC)

    STEERING COURSE

    (Course Description)

     

    Following the promulgation of the STCW ’95 convention and ISM Code, the Far East Maritime Foundation, Inc. Initiated to put up a training course program for ratings to be knowledgeable and competent in handling the steering wheel or helm of the ship. Steering courses as per command or order from the Master or navigating officer must not be taken for granted as this is one specific work of a helmsman to be alert at all time, has the knowledge to understand command orders. Thus, avoiding accident in an open sea, channels, straits and or maneuvering during at anchor docking and undocking in port.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    1. The objective of this training course program is set the procedures for precision in steering and maintain its reliance by achieving safe maneuvering and navigation.

    2. To inculcate to the seafarers the importance of the training program appertaining to steering to helms order in-port maneuvering, straits, channels and open seas.

     

    ENTRY STANDARDS

     

    This Course is open to all deck ratings specifically to ratings that are to serve onboard seagoing merchant ship.

     

    INCLUDED TOPIC

     

    • Introduction

    • Helmsmanship

    • Magnetic Compass

    • Gyro Compass

    • Rudder and Rudder Indicators

    • Basic Helm Order

    • Steering System

    • Case Study

    • Practical

    • Steering and Compliance with Helm Command

    • Different Helm Orders and courses to execute.

  • Ship Security Officer Course (SSO)

    SHIP SECURITY OFFICER

    (Course Description)

     

    SCOPE

     

    This model course is intended to provide knowledge to those who may be designated to perform the duties and responsibilities of a Ship Security Officer (SSO), as defined in section A/2.1.6 (and section A/12) of the ISPS Code and in section A-VI/5 of the STCW Code, as amended, and in particular the duties and responsibilities with respect to the security of a ship, for implementing and maintaining a Ship Security Plan and for liaising with the Company Security Officer (CSO) and with Port Facility Security Officers (PFSOs).

     

    With this revision of the Ship Security Officer course, specific training to address the problem of piracy and armed robbery against ships is emphasized. The framework for these revisions is found in Section A-VI/5 of the 2010 amendments to the STCW Code.

     

    OBJECTIVE

     

    Those who will successfully complete this course should be able to undertake the duties and responsibilities as a Ship Security Officer, as defined in section A/12.2 of the ISPS Code and in section A-VI/5 of the STCW Code, as amended, which include, but are not limited to:

     

    1. Undertaking regular security inspections of the ship to ensure that appropriate security measures are maintained;

     

    2. Maintaining and supervising the implementation of the Ship Security Plan, including any amendments to the plan;

     

    3. Coordinating the security aspects of passengers, and/or the handling of cargo and ship’s stores with other shipboard personnel and with the relevant Port Facility Security Officers;

     

    4. Proposing modifications to the Ship Security Plan;

     

    5. Reporting to the Company Security Officer any deficiencies and non-conformities identified during internal audits, periodic reviews, security inspections and verifications of compliance and implementing corrective actions;

     

    6. Enhancing security awareness and vigilance on board;

     

    7. Ensuring that adequate training has been provided to shipboard personnel as appropriate;

     

    8. Reporting all security incidents;

    9. Coordinating implementation of the Ship Security Plan with the Company Security Officer and relevant Port Facility Security Officer; and

     

    10. Ensuring that security equipment is properly operated, tested, calibrated and maintained, if any.

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